Hectic Weekend

Hectic Weekend

This is it, the final countdown for 2017. It's been a great year in retrospective, the year we gave birth to Toothy Saber, the website, podcast and the spinoff Portuguese, SMUC podcast. It's the year we realised our long ago aspirations of, as Luís likes to say, becoming "digital influencers". I think he's aiming too high but I like where his head is. I'm just happy I can have a good looking place to share my thoughts and dreams with a good old friend. We both hope that in the process we managed to entertain, entice you, and get your expectations high for whats coming for 2018 both in the technology & science world in general, and Toothy Saber in particular. Well, not too high... 


And as is customary to do so in the season, we would love to recommend to both this week and year-end, some of our articles that we've shared in 2017. We really hope you enjoyed them as much as we did in writing them.


I couldn't let this season go without sharing one of my favorite Macstories kind or article. The exceedingly entertaining and useful lists of recommended apps and games for 2017. John and Federico arguably make some of the best choices of MacOS and iOS software that we stand by for and actually use quite a lot of them if not all. So get in and enjoy their recommendations.

My Must-Have Mac Apps, 2017 Edition

It's been quite a year. At the start, I was still commuting to Chicago every day to work in a law office full of Windows PCs. Now I work from my home studio surrounded by Apple hardware, moving back and forth from a late-2016 MacBook Pro to iOS devices as I write and talk about [...]

My Favorite iOS Games of 2017

As 2017 draws to a close, we've seen what may prove to be a shift in iOS gaming. With the recent introduction of app pre-orders, iOS may attract more paid-up-front indie games and ports of console and PC titles than in the past. Pre-orders aren't limited to games, but it's no coincidence that the first [...]


The iPhone 8 got obscured by the launch of the iPhone X. It was the star of the show, the new shiny thing and an object of desire (deservedly so), but that meant that most of us didn't pay enough attention to the iPhone 8. On this episode of Vector, Rene Ritchie gives us an exhaustive look at the iPhone 8 with the advantage of an extended period of use. 


I'm a big fan of the Civilization games. I played CIV I and II, and then abandoned the franchise for several years until I tried CIV V and got hooked again. Desiring a more mobile experience I bought the iOS version and it was an unpleasant surprise. My favourite iPad games are turn-based, and I think its a genre that fits exceptionally well with the platform but playing  Civilization on it reminded me more of those earlier games than its current iteration on the PC. Thoroughly disappointed I deleted the iOS version and bought Civilization VI on Steam and resigned myself that it was a game to complex for a good iOS adaptation. Sometimes it feels so good to be wrong. CIV VI just got released for the iPad, and according to early reviews, it's as good as its PC sibling. 


This American Life is a top-rated show, and I listen to an episode from time to time, when I find the topic interesting. When I read the description of this one, I decided that it was one that I could not miss and I'm glad I didn't. Everybody makes mistakes, and I'm particularly bothered in work environments where admitting a mistake marks you as incompetent instead of being used as a learning experience. How much could we learn from one another if we were honest about our blunders? I mainly tend to distrust people that don't make them because either they are covering them up, placing the blame on someone else or not taking chances. That's fine in a normal work environment but what happens when your work can't afford any mistakes because the magnitude of the consequences is immense. In this episode, a sequence of errors and unfortunate events show that if humans are involved, mistakes will happen and pretending that it isn't the case can have dangerous consequences. 


Science you see, sometimes has a way of making it appear as if there's not much else to figure out in some areas. You'd be forgiven to think so, since the golden days of taxonomy by the hands of whom is considered the father of taxonomy and zoology the Swedish naturalist named Carolus Linnaeus, species discovery and description, especially of vertebrates has gone down. And yet every year we see more species getting discovered and even a lot of vertebrates, mainly birds, but also reptiles, amphibians, and less so mammals. Birdlife International, the biggest ONG for bird research and conservation, has released a 2017 list of 10 of the most spectacular findings of new bird species. If like us you like birdwatching and nature in general, this is a great article to keep your hopes high for a 2018 big year list!

New year, new birds: 10 newly-recognised species

BirdLife is proud to announce that Volume 2 of the Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World is now available to purchase. Published by Lynx Edicions in association with HBW and BirdLife International, Volume 2 chronicles the world's passerines (perching birds), and completes the most exhaustive illustrated checklist of birds ever compiled, with stunning, full-colour portraits of all the world's 10,965 extant species.

Non-disclosure Admission

Non-disclosure Admission

EP19: It's Not for You

EP19: It's Not for You