Rainy Weekend

Rainy Weekend

In this section, we recommend the content that we liked most this week. It may not be new, and have a range of formats, the only thing that matters is that it managed to distinguish itself from everything else we heard, read or viewed in the past week.


Car crashes are a common event these days and are a consequence we accept every time we get into one. We tend to think it won't happen to us but most people know someone who was involved in a car crash or even been in one ourselves. I had one, a few years ago and got out unscathed because the car that crashed into me manage to decrease the seed before the collision to parameters that my car was designed to withstand. The evolution of the safety measures in vehicles diminished the fatalities in 80% over the last 50 years in the US, but there was a time that car manufacturers completely ignored survivability during car design an construction.  In the first decade's car manufacturers tended to blame the drivers for accidents and exempted themselves out of any responsibility. In this episode will get to know the history of car safety standards and the importance that regulation had in achieving it.


The first surface named product made by Microsoft was a table with a 30-inch multi-touch screen that looked similar to future interfaces seen in science fiction movies. Ten years later, most people probably never saw one, and the surface brand was reused for tablets and laptops. Watch the presentation video and find out what its like to use a surface table in 2017. 


In one of the most famous scenes from the Harry Potter series, a group of kids, new to the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, line up before an old and crumpled wizard's hat. It is the sorting hat. The hat will tell them which house they'll belong to during their Hogwarts education.
There is something deeply appealing about the sorting hat. It is wise. It seems to know people better than they know themselves.
We humans love this kind of insight. And our drive to better understand ourselves and the people around us has led to the creation of a multi-billion dollar industry built around personality testing.

Violence in video games has been one of my main topics of concern in recent years since this media is very close to my heart and receives such bad publicity from media outlets. The psychology and social repercussions behind it are also fascinating and that's why this week I'd love to recommend one of the very best sources of information on this topic that I ever found. The Psychology of Video Games is such a source. Run by Jamie Madigan, PhD in psychology and a heavy player and gamer nerd, his insightful articles are one of the best I've ever come across and its recent foray into the podcasting world is also as great has his written pieces.
Regarding the topic of video game violence, the author, and his interviewed guests make us realize that violent content in games is not exactly the best descriptor of gamer violence, difficulty and input form is a better one.
Frustration doesn't translate well to the real world regardless of medium and a way to fix such occurrences could lie in positive feedback on losing scenarios.
One of the researcher says "I think video games might have more in common with each game type then they do with other forms of media. So I think that probably playing LEGO, playing Settlers of Catan or Playing America Football is more similar to Halo then watching Kill Bill". So it has very little to do with media. Take a dive in this knowledgeable channel and tells us what you think!

001 - Video Game Frustration, Aggression, and Rage Quitting - Psychology of Video Games Podcast

Text. Pfft. Text is dead, am I right? Voice without video, THAT'S the future. Given that, I've decided to dip into the world of podcasting and have recorded my first episode. I talked to Dr. Andrew Przybylski from Oxford University about research that he and his colleagues have done on video game violence, frustration, aggression, and motivation.


Games, animes, movies, books, and podcasts. Sci-fi is everywhere and you don't need to go far and search deep to get a lot of great content these days! One particular theme that we enjoy a lot and that is probably on the verge of coming to reality are power suits or exoskeletons. This week The Verge has come up with a cool article for us to keep dreaming of the possibilities that this sci-fi tech might bring us in the future.

18 suits of power armor from science fiction you don't want to meet on the battlefield

Power armor and exoskeletons are a staple in science fiction. They enhance the abilities of futuristic soldiers on the battlefield, giving them an edge against their enemies. Recently, my colleague Lauren Goode finished out the second season of her series Next Level by checking out the promising future of exoskeletons in the workplace.


I've been hearing rumors about an autonomous electric car from Apple for some time now. In more recent months some of them have seemed to have been losing strength. We already heard that Apple's secretive car project has shifted focus over recent years and even Tim Cook confirmed that they were working on software that would help cars to truly be autonomous. Regardless, now we're hearing that Apple's director of AI research, Ruslan Salakhutdinov spoke before a group of AI experts at the end of a conference about how Apple is using machine learning for vehicle cameras' data analyses. According to Wired, he didn't go into details regarding Apple's car project, but Apple focus seems clearly honed at making software that they can implement on some form of hardware for car driving automation. What that hardware will be remain to be seen, for one I'm really curious to know how and when Apple is revealing what it wants to do with this new tech. Whatever that is, we can rest assured that roads are about to get safer in the future.

Apple's AI director on advances in machine learning for its self-driving car project

Apple's secretive autonomous car project has shifted focus over the years, but this year, it seems to be picking up speed. In April, the company received a permit to test self-driving cars in California, while in June, Apple CEO Tim Cook confirmed that they were working on software that could allow cars - and maybe other things - to drive themselves.

EP18: On Your Left

EP18: On Your Left

Toothy Saber Apple AirPods Review

Toothy Saber Apple AirPods Review